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Potential applications of synthetic bioceramic bone

graft substitute in spinal surgery

A. BARBANERA, G.P. LONGO, M. VITALI, S. SPRIO*, A. TAMPIERI*

Neurosurgery Department, “SS. Antonio and Biagio” Hospital, Alessandria, Italy

* Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics - National Research Council of Italy (ISTEC-CNR),

Faenza (Ravenna), Italy

 

 

 

 

Summary

 

 

 

 

 

 

Progress in Neuroscience 2013; 1 (1-4): 97-104.

doi: 10.14588/PiN.2013.Barbanera.97

 

 

 

 

 

 

The number of spine operations is increasing sharply both in the United States, which is at the forefront of the field, and in Europe. Reconstruction of bone loss has been an important clinical challenge for many years, and the various surgical approaches involve, among other things, the use of bone substitutes. To this end a large variety of techniques and materials are available to the surgeon, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Over the last 30 years, more and more synthetic bone graft substitutes have been used to minimise complications associated with the use of autologous and homologous bone, namely morbidity, limited availability, significant incidence of postoperative infections, and potential risk of disease transmission. Synthetic bone grafts have the decided advantages of ready availability, sterility and reduced morbidity. However, at the same time their cost is relatively high, and not all are fully biomimetic. The aim of the present work was to verify the possible applications of bone substitutes in spinal surgery, and to assess their characteristics from the surgeons’ point of view. This article examines the pathologies that require the use of bone substitutes in spinal surgery, in which the focus is more and more on quality and adequate quantity. The main synthetic bioceramic bone graft substitutes, which, owing to their chemical, physical and mechanical properties, can be used in spinal surgery are then described, citing some example applications.

KEY WORDS: Bioceramics, Bone graft substitute, Innovation, Spine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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 Progress in Neuroscience - ISSN 2240-5135 - Copyright  © 2011-2015 SNO & new MAGAZINE s.r.l. - Italy